Electronics Engineering Herald                 
Home | News | New Products | India Specific | Design Guide | Sourcing database | Student Section | About us | Contact us | What's New

News

  Date:16th May 2012

Single-chip ethylene sensor to monitor fruit ripening, reports Imec and Holst Centre

Imec and Holst Centre have demonstrated a single-chip electrochemical sensor for ethylene monitoring with a detection limit of 200-300ppb (parts per billion). Imec and Holst Centre's solution enables small-size and low-cost ethylene detection systems applicable in the fruit distribution and retail sector.

Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone produced by fruit and is responsible for the ripening of fruit. It is also sprayed in high concentrations (~1,000 ppm) in the warehouse, to force fruit to ripen. Inexpensive and accurate ethylene sensors would enable better control of that process, and allow the distribution sector and retailers to avoid waste.

Today's ethylene detection systems are lab-scale, expensive table-top devices, not suitable for the above mentioned applications. Imec and Holst Centre's ethylene sensor is a low-cost electrochemical sensor based on a non-acidic electrolyte that does not evaporate. It can be fabricated on cheap substrates such as glass or foil. Recent improvements have shown that the ethylene sensor is able to detect 100ppb steps in concentrations below 1ppm, which makes it directly useful in warehouse applications.

The companies said that they are ready to work with component suppliers for industrialization of this new sensor and with system suppliers to integrate the sensor into ethylene measurement and control systems. They are further miniaturizing the sensor, and increasing the performance towards lower detection limits (~10-20 ppb) to enable other applications such as monitoring of plants, vegetables, flowers, etc., in greenhouses. Further decrease in the power consumption, improvement of dedicated read-out electronics to enable miniaturization of the system as a whole, and the development of the sensors onto flexible substrates is planned, paving the way for use in smart packaging.


 
          
Xilinx 7 series FPGA
Home | News | New Products | India Specific | Design Guide | Sourcing database | Student Section | About us | Contact us | What's New
©2012 Electronics Engineering Herald